<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
  </head>
  <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#FFFFFF">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 10/15/2017 3:13 PM, Stephan Houben
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite"
cite="mid:CAOOa=pMkL-y6AxzCBbprFLC0GGLXud3HuB2600kO9QqdePyDWg@mail.gmail.com">
      <meta http-equiv="Context-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
      <div dir="ltr">
        <div>
          <div>Hi all,<br>
            <br>
          </div>
          I propose multiples of the Planck time, 5.39 × 10 <sup>−44</sup>
          s.<br>
        </div>
        <div>Unlikely computers can be more accurate than that anytime
          soon.<br>
          <br>
        </div>
        <div>On a more serious note, I am not sure what problem was
          solved by moving from<br>
        </div>
        <div>double to a fixed-precision format. <br>
          <br>
          I do know that it now introduced the issue of finding <br>
          the correct base unit of the fixed-precision format.</div>
      </div>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    From Victor's original message, describing the current functions
    using 64-bit binary floating point numbers (aka double). They lose
    precision:<br>
    <br>
    "The problem is that Python returns time as a floatting point number<br>
    which is usually a 64-bit binary floatting number (in the IEEE 754<br>
    format). This type starts to loose nanoseconds after 104 days."<br>
    <br>
    Eric.<br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>