<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000">I thought this thread did a good job of establishing that looking at other languages</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000">is not going to help with introducing assignment expressions into Python. It was still</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000">interesting to read.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000">If we can't copy from other languages (or even agree on *which* languages to copy),</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000">Python will have to do something novel or give up on this.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000">I thought, if the thread's dead, it'd be nice to do a bit of bike-shedding on the end,</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000">but there was no appetite for that.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000">I'm not the most sensitive guy, and don't really have a sense of how my posts are</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000">being received, but would appreciate being told if my contribution isn't especially</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000">welcome.</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000">Best,</div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small;color:#000000"><br></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br clear="all"><div><div class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><span style="color:rgb(115,115,115);font-style:italic;line-height:18px"><font size="1" face="monospace, monospace">-- Carl Smith</font></span><br></div></div><div><span style="color:rgb(115,115,115);font-style:italic;line-height:18px"><font size="1" face="monospace, monospace"><a href="mailto:carl.input@gmail.com" target="_blank">carl.input@gmail.com</a></font></span></div></div></div></div></div></div>
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On 22 May 2018 at 02:58, Chris Angelico <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:rosuav@gmail.com" target="_blank">rosuav@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">On Tue, May 22, 2018 at 11:45 AM, Brendan Barnwell<br>
<<a href="mailto:brenbarn@brenbarn.net">brenbarn@brenbarn.net</a>> wrote:<br>
> On 2018-05-21 12:11, Chris Angelico wrote:<br>
>><br>
>> Much more useful would be to look at languages that (a) work in a<br>
>> field where programmers have ample freedom to choose between<br>
>> languages, and (b) have been around long enough to actually<br>
>> demonstrate that people want to use them. Look through the Stack<br>
>> Overflow Developer Survey's report on languages:<br>
>><br>
>><br>
>> <a href="https://insights.stackoverflow.com/survey/2018/#most-loved-dreaded-and-wanted" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://insights.<wbr>stackoverflow.com/survey/2018/<wbr>#most-loved-dreaded-and-wanted</a><br>
>><br>
>> A "Wanted" language is one that many developers say "I don't currently<br>
>> use, but I would like to". (It may also be a language that has<br>
>> murdered semicolons. I believe the bounty on JavaScript's head is<br>
>> quite high now.) Go through that list and you'll get an idea of what<br>
>> people wish they could use; then toss out anything that hasn't been<br>
>> around for at least 10 years, because there's a tendency for new<br>
>> technologies to be over-represented in a "Wanted" listing (partly<br>
>> because fewer programmers already know them, and partly because people<br>
>> want to try the latest toys). That may give you a better list of<br>
>> languages to compare against.<br>
><br>
><br>
>         I'd say that also has limited usefulness.  The problem is that<br>
> people may "want" to learn a language for many reasons, and "the language<br>
> made good design choices" is only one such reason.  A lot of people may want<br>
> to use JavaScript because it's hip or in demand or because they can (or<br>
> think they can) make money with it.  But I'm not so interested in that.<br>
> What interests me is: what are the languages that people specifically<br>
> believe are superior to other languages *in design*?  (Even better would be<br>
> what are the languages that actually ARE superior, in some reasonably<br>
> nonsubjective, definable, way, but we have even less data on that.)<br>
><br>
<br>
</div></div>What you want is virtually impossible to obtain, so we go for whatever<br>
approximations we can actually get hold of.<br>
<br>
There are a few reasons someone might want to use a language. One is<br>
"I hate this language but it'll earn me money", yes, but the way the<br>
Stack Overflow survey is worded, those ones won't come up. IIRC the<br>
wording is "which languages do you desire to be using next year",<br>
after removing the ones for which you also said that you're using them<br>
now. So there are a good few reasons that you might wish you could be<br>
using a language:<br>
<br>
1) You believe it's a good language, worth using, but just have never<br>
gotten around to starting with it<br>
2) You think it's really fun and awesome, and wish your employer would<br>
let you use that instead of what you currently use<br>
3) It represents a particular coding arena that you want to get into<br>
(eg you want to get into iOS development, so you pick "Swift")<br>
4) It's an absolutely awesome language and you have plans to learn it,<br>
but haven't executed on them yet<br>
5) It's a new language, and you want the shinies<br>
6) Etc, etc, etc.<br>
<br>
Generally speaking, for a language to show up in the "Most Wanted", a<br>
lot of developers have to think it's something worth knowing. After<br>
cutting out the youngest languages (which I defined as "released<br>
within the last ten years") to remove their overrepresentation, you're<br>
left with languages that, in the opinions of people who don't yet<br>
program in them, are worth learning. That's far from an exact answer<br>
to the question we really want to ask, but it's reasonably concrete<br>
(to the extent that surveys ever are).<br>
<br>
But as Guido says, this is not a popular vote among languages. It's<br>
interesting to notice what other languages are doing, but harder to<br>
pin down what's good or bad about what they're doing.<br>
<br>
ChrisA<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
Python-ideas mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:Python-ideas@python.org">Python-ideas@python.org</a><br>
<a href="https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-ideas" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://mail.python.org/<wbr>mailman/listinfo/python-ideas</a><br>
Code of Conduct: <a href="http://python.org/psf/codeofconduct/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://python.org/psf/<wbr>codeofconduct/</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br></div>