<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote">[Tim]<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">> Note that transforming<br>
> <br>
>     {EXPR!d:FMT}<br>
> <br>
> into<br>
> <br>
>     EXPR={repr(EXPR):FMT}<br>
> <br>
> is actually slightly more involved than transforming it into<br>
> <br>
>     EXPR={EXPR:FMT}<br>
> <br>
> so I don't buy the argument that the original idea is simpler.  More <br>
> magical and less useful, yes ;-)<br></blockquote><div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">[Eric V. Smith]<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">Actually, my proposal is to apply FMT to the entire result of </blockquote></div></div></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
EXPR={repr(EXPR)}, not just the repr(EXPR) part. I'm not sure either is <br>
particularly useful.<br></blockquote><div><br>So the actual transformation is from</div><div><br></div><div>    {EXPR!d:FMT}<br><br>to</div><br>    {"EXPR=" + repr(EXPR):FMT}<br><br>I expect I'll barely use "!d" at all if the format doesn't apply to the result of EXPR, so I have no non-contrived ;-) opinion about that.</div><div class="gmail_quote"><br>BTW, I checked, and I've never used !r, !s, or !a.  So the idea that the format could apply to a string - when EXPR itself doesn't evaluate to a string - is simply foreign to me.  I suppose it's natural to people who do use ![rsa] all the time - if such people exist ;-)<br><br></div></div>