<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div>Thanks robert for the praise. It feels nice.<br></div><div><br></div><div>I may be bold, but I really hate to come empty handed to a discussion. So this lib is nothing more than doing my homework when I don't have a PhD.</div><div><br></div><div>Actually, science (in my opinion) is about measuring. What I propose is nothing more than (if you add Vector traits) giving native metrics to objects (having coded in Perl for too long I still see objects as a hierarchy of blessed MutableMappings, I am sorry). And I think that measurements are a corner stone of science, thus of data science. (my opinion you may not share).<br></div><div><br></div><div>Thus it could be kind of extending some of the concepts of datasets : <a href="https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0557/">https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0557/</a> to additionnal default behaviour (that could be subscribed optionnally).</div><div><br></div><div>As an everyday coder, this behaviour does solve problems I can illustrate with code (like aggregating data, or measuring if I might have doubon in a set of dataset, transforming objects into objects).</div><div><br></div><div>I do not want to force feed the community with my "brilliant" ideas, I much more would like to plead my case on how adopting "consistent geometric behaviours" at the language level would ease our lives as coders, if this is not inappropriate.</div><div><br></div><div>Please don't look at the lib. Look at the idea of making operators 
behave in a consistent way that gives the property of well known 
mathematic <br><div>constructions to the core of the language.</div><div><br></div> </div><div>It also enables parallelisation without side effects (aka the map reduce of the poors), which are a first order consequence of the linear algebrae.<br></div><div><br></div><div>I may not be gifted with writing long dissertations, however, I have a pragmatic mind. So I don't mind being challenged a tad, as long as we talk about stuffs like : how does it profit python coders to be standard, can you show me real life example ?<br></div><div><br></div><div>However, if a "no (answer)" is a "no", I do understand. I like python the way it is, and I don't want to introduce friction in the process of improving python by being off topic.<br></div></div><div dir="ltr"><br></div><div>Thus if no one is interested, I still have a last word : keep up the good work! And thank you all for what you bring us.</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Cheers<br></div><div dir="ltr"><div><br></div></div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Tue, 30 Oct 2018 at 19:11, Robert Vanden Eynde <<a href="mailto:robertve92@gmail.com">robertve92@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto">Julien, your article is very pleasant to read (and funny) but as other say the mailing list is not there to share some articles, but for proposition to the standard python library,<div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">do our own lib on github and pypi first if you want to Share some code to the world !</div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">And if project becomes super useful to everyone one day, it may come one day to the standard library so that everybody will have it.</div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">Cheers, </div><div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">Robert</div></div>
</blockquote></div>