<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">On Fri, Dec 7, 2018 at 10:48 AM Antoine Pitrou <<a href="mailto:solipsis@pitrou.net" target="_blank">solipsis@pitrou.net</a>> wrote:</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
If the site is vulnerable to modifications, then TLS doesn't help.<br>
Again: you must verify the GPG signatures (since they are produced by<br>
the release manager's private key, which is *not* stored on the<br>
<a href="http://python.org" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">python.org</a> Web site).<br></blockquote><div><br>This is missing the point. They were asking why not to use SHA512. The answer is that the hash does not provide any extra security. GPG is separate: even if there was no GPG signature, SHA512 would still not provide any extra security. That's why I said "more to the point". :P<br><br>Nobody "must" verify the GPG signatures. TLS doesn't protect against everything, but neither does GPG. A naive user might just download a public GPG key from a compromised <a href="http://python.org" target="_blank">python.org</a> and use it to verify the compromised release, see everything is "OK", and still be hosed.</div><div><br></div><div>-- DevinĀ </div></div></div></div>