<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Mon, Jan 7, 2019 at 12:19 PM David Mertz <<a href="mailto:mertz@gnosis.cx">mertz@gnosis.cx</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">Under a partial ordering, a median may not be unique.  Even under a total ordering this is true if some subset of elements form an equivalence class.  But under partial ordering, the non-uniqueness can get much weirder.<br></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I'm sure with more thought, weirder things can be thought of.  But just as a quick example, it would be easy to write classes such that:</div><div><br></div><div>    a < b < c < a</div><div><br></div><div>In such a case (or expand for an odd number of distinct things), it would be reasonable to call ANY element of [a, b, c] a median. That's funny, but it is not imprecise.</div><div><br></div><div>-- <br></div></div><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature">Keeping medicines from the bloodstreams of the sick; food <br>from the bellies of the hungry; books from the hands of the <br>uneducated; technology from the underdeveloped; and putting <br>advocates of freedom in prisons.  Intellectual property is<br>to the 21st century what the slave trade was to the 16th.<br></div></div>