<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Tue, Mar 5, 2019 at 6:07 PM Raymond Hettinger <<a href="mailto:raymond.hettinger@gmail.com">raymond.hettinger@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><br>
> On Mar 5, 2019, at 2:13 PM, Greg Ewing <<a href="mailto:greg.ewing@canterbury.ac.nz" target="_blank">greg.ewing@canterbury.ac.nz</a>> wrote:<br>
> <br>
> Rhodri James wrote:<br>
>> I have to go and look in the documentation because I expect the union operator to be '+'.<br>
> <br>
> Anyone raised on Pascal is likely to find + and * more<br>
> natural. Pascal doesn't have bitwise operators, so it<br>
> re-uses + and * for set operations. I like the economy<br>
> of this arrangement -- it's not as if there's any<br>
> other obvious meaning that + and * could have for sets.<br>
<br>
The language SETL (the language of sets) also uses + and * for set operations.¹<br></blockquote><div> <br></div><div>So the secret is out: Python inherits a lot from SETL, through ABC -- ABC was heavily influenced by SETL.<br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
¹ <a href="https://www.linuxjournal.com/article/6805" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://www.linuxjournal.com/article/6805</a><br>
² <a href="https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0218/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0218/</a><br clear="all"></blockquote></div><br>-- <br><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature">--Guido van Rossum (<a href="http://python.org/~guido" target="_blank">python.org/~guido</a>)</div></div>