<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">Are you all REALY=LU proposing more operators?<div><br></div><div>Adding @ made sense because there was an important use case for which there was no existing operator to use.</div><div><br></div><div>But in this case, we have + and | available, both of which are pretty good options.</div><div><br></div><div>Finally, which dicts are a very important ue ase, do we want to add an operator just for that?</div><div><br></div><div>What would it mean for sets, for instance?</div><div><br></div><div>I have to say, the whole discussion seems to me to be a massive bike-shedding exercise -- the original proposal was to simply define + for dicts. </div><div><br></div><div>It's totally reasonable to not like that idea at all, or to propose that | is a better option, but this has really gone off the rails!</div><div><br></div><div>I guess I say that because this wasn't started with a critical use-case that really needed a solution, but rather: "the + operator isn't being used for dicts, why not make a semi-common operation easily available"</div><div><br></div><div>So my opinion, which I'm re-stating:</div><div><br></div><div>using + to merge dicts is simple, non-disruptive, and unlikely to really confuse anyone - so why not?</div><div><br></div><div>( | would be OK, too, though I think a tad less accessible to newbies)</div><div><br></div><div>But I don't think that having an operator to merge dicts is a critical use-case worth of adding a new operator or new syntax to the to the language.<br></div><div><br></div><div>-CHB</div><div><br></div></div><div><br></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature">Christopher Barker, PhD<br><br> Python Language Consulting<br>  - Teaching<br>  - Scientific Software Development<br>  - Desktop GUI and Web Development<br>  - wxPython, numpy, scipy, Cython<br></div></div>