<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Mon, Mar 18, 2019 at 3:42 PM Greg Ewing <<a href="mailto:greg.ewing@canterbury.ac.nz">greg.ewing@canterbury.ac.nz</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">Tim Delaney wrote:<br>
> I would argue the opposite - the use of "is" shows a clear knowledge <br>
> that True and False are each a singleton and the author explicitly <br>
> intended to use them that way.<br>
<br>
I don't think you can infer that. It could equally well be someone who's<br>
*not* familiar with Python truth rules and really just meant "if x".<br>
Or someone who's unfamiliar with booleans in general and thinks that<br>
every "if" statement has to have a comparison in it.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Regardless of whether it's idiomatic Python code or not, this pattern ("is True:") can be found all over Python code in the wild.</div><div><br></div><div>If CPython ever broke this guarantee, quite a few popular libraries on pypi would be broken, including pandas, sqlalchemy, attrs and even Python's own standard library:</div><div><a href="https://github.com/python/cpython/blob/c183444f7e2640b054956474d71aae6e8d31a543/Lib/textwrap.py#L175">https://github.com/python/cpython/blob/c183444f7e2640b054956474d71aae6e8d31a543/Lib/textwrap.py#L175</a><br></div></div></div></div>