<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div>On Sat, Mar 23, 2019 at 2:43 PM Andre Roberge <<a href="mailto:andre.roberge@gmail.com">andre.roberge@gmail.com</a>> wrote: <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div><div style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;font-size:small">My original message was referring to someone writing ":" instead of "=" by mistake -- nothing to do with the walrus assignment, but rather using the same notation to assign a value to a key as they would when defining a dict.</div></div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div>OK, I read your Original Post for this thread, about accidentally writing `d["answer"]: 42` instead of `d["answer"] = 42`.</div><div><br></div><div>My reaction is that this was a user mistake of the same kind as accidentally writing `x + 1` instead of `x += 1`. That's just going to happen, very occasionally. (Though why? The ':' and '=' keys are not that close together.) Read your code carefully, or in an extreme case step through it in a debugger, and you'll notice the mistake.<br></div><div><br></div><div>It's not a reason to pick on that particular syntax, and not much of a  reason to try and introduce a mechanism to disable type hints. Sorry.<br></div><div><br></div><div>PS. This particular syntax was introduced by PEP 526, and introduced in Python 3.6.<br></div><div> </div></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature">--Guido van Rossum (<a href="http://python.org/~guido" target="_blank">python.org/~guido</a>)</div></div>