<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div>More on negative strings. They are easier, if they only use one character.</div><div><br></div><div>Red Queen: What's one and one and one and one and one and one and one and one and one and one and one and one and one?</div><div>Alice: I don't know. I lost count.</div><div>Red Queen: She can't do arithmetic.</div><div><br></div><div>3 --> 'aaa'</div><div>2 --> 'aa'</div><div>1 --> 'a'</div><div>0 --> ''</div><div>-1 -> -'a'</div><div>-2 -> -'aa'</div><div>-3 -> -'aaa'</div><div><br></div><div>Negative strings are easier if we can rearrange the order of the letters. Like anagrams.</div><div><br></div><div>    >>> ''.join(sorted('forty five'))<br></div><div><div>    ' effiortvy'</div><div>    >>> ''.join(sorted('over fifty'))</div><div>    ' effiortvy'</div><div><br></div><div>Instead of counting (positively and negatively) just the letter 'a', we do the whole alphabet.</div><div><br></div><div>By when order matters, we get an enormous free group, which Python programmers by accident see.</div><div><br></div><div>I hope this helps.</div><div><br></div><div>-- </div><div>Jonathan</div><div><br></div></div><div><br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr"><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">
</blockquote></div></div></div>