Forth like interpreter

Greg Ewing greg at cosc.canterbury.ac.nz
Thu Mar 16 00:44:31 CET 2000


"Samuel A. Falvo II" wrote:
> 
> Well, I don't know.  The PDP11 is the progenitor of the 68K line of CPUs.

The 68K certainly shows its PDP11 inspiration, but in 
a rather twisted way in places. Most of the differences
are improvements, all things considered, but it lost
some of the elegance along the way.

> All it really needs is near single-cycle execution, superscalar
> architecture, and more registers, and there you have it.  :)
> 
> I think it should be called the PDP-2000, but I digress.  ;)

It's interesting to speculate on what a 32-bit PDP11 might
be like. With a 32-bit opcode, you could have 256 * 3-general-
operand instructions, with 32 registers and all the PDP11
addressing modes. Hmmm, I've always though it would be
fun to build a processor from scratch...

Erk, I'll have to go and write an emulator for it in Python
now, to get this back on topic! Back in a moment...

-- 
Greg Ewing, Computer Science Dept,
+--------------------------------------+
University of Canterbury,	   | A citizen of NewZealandCorp, a	  |
Christchurch, New Zealand	   | wholly-owned subsidiary of USA Inc.  |
greg at cosc.canterbury.ac.nz	   +--------------------------------------+



More information about the Python-list mailing list