newbie question

Rob Andrews rob at jam.rr.com
Thu Aug 23 08:18:42 CEST 2001


George Garnett wrote:
> 
> Well, I 'did' ask for it (the criticisms), didn't I?
> 
> Anyway, the issue is what is the future of jpython, and what is its future
> relative to JSP (and also relative to javascript, which is also developing
> into its own full language)? Also, what role should each language play in a
> design, if they are used together. I suggest looking on-line for computer
> magazine articles rather than relying on user's opinions (including myself).
> Try to find sources that aren't focused solely on java (such as 'java
> world') or python (such as 'python world'?).

Hmmmmmm..... Now, there's a thought.

 No doubt jpython will fill a
> specific market niche just like java. However, I've seen many companies go
> belly up and I wonder about jpython. How can they compete with an upcoming
> powerhouse like JSP in the long term?

Jython's a nice piece of work, I think. Jython is 100% Pure Java,
anyway, so it would make little sense for Jython to oppose Java. Have
you downloaded the Jython install? It's a self-extracting .class file.
Jython source compiles to Java bytecodes and provides access to existing
Java libraries. And it adds Python's sweet syntax and familiar
interactive coding environment.

And when it comes to language choice as a career decision, I think it is
a good idea to write code enjoyably. Learn several languages, write lots
and lots and lots of code, and develop a personal idea of when different
approaches are appropriate. Device driver? Try something along the lines
of C. It's lunchtime, and you just remembered you were supposed to turn
in some serious socket programming by early afternoon? Definitely
Python, with Java as a perhaps-not-impossible fall-back plan. Beyond a
certain point, it's pretty subjective.

Since the original poster is coming from an intermediate VB background,
Python isn't a bad investment of time. You can convert some of your VB
scripts into Python equivalents. Python's rapid learning curve can
enable a serious student to move into *serious programming* quickly, and
the lessons learned extend into other languages.

> 
> "atonal" <watchtheclosingdoors at yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:48256545.0108221258.5882c94f at posting.google.com...
> > i have beginning-to-intermediate level vb6/vba programming skills and
> > would like to find employment before long in a technical capacity.
> >
> > something tells me that vb is not my ticket, and i am intrigued by
> > python.
> >
> > for now i am somewhat wedded to ms windows and ms office, but i gather
> > that python can be used in many ways in place of vba, and that in
> > general it would offer more career opportunities.
> >
> > anyone agree or disagree?  advice is welcome, and thanks in advance.

Rob
-- 
A {} is a terrible thing to waste.
Useless Python!
http://www.lowerstandard.com/python



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