Light Speed Socket Connections

Fredrik Lundh fredrik at pythonware.com
Fri Jul 13 22:51:48 CEST 2001


Steve Holden wrote

> Well, after this little experiment on PythonWin 2.0/Win95 I'm no longer
> sure what is going on:
>
> >>> for i in range(10):
> ...  time.sleep(2.5)
> ...  print time.time(), time.clock()
> ...
> 994956779.3 5.86667560636e-006
> 994956781.88 2.55270956603
> 994956784.41 5.0637313733
> 994956786.94 7.58865720176
> 994956789.41 10.1181121038
> 994956791.99 12.6327050403
> 994956794.46 15.1421897786
> 994956796.99 17.6518547076
> 994956799.51 20.1890552976
> 994956802.04 22.7061055331
>
> Is my CPU usage really ~100% during those sleeps?

from the Python library reference:

    clock()

    Return the current CPU time as a floating point
    number expressed in seconds. The precision, and
    in fact the very definition of the meaning of ''CPU
    time'' , depends on that of the C function of the
    same name

ANSI C leaves the "era" and resolution open, and Microsoft
has defined it as:

    The clock function's era begins (with a value of 0)
    when the C program starts to execute. It returns
    times measured in 1/CLOCKS_PER_SEC (which
    equals 1/1000 for Microsoft C).

In recent version, I think "when the C program starts to
execute" means "when the C program first calls the clock
function", but you get the idea.

Cheers /F





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