Large-scale Python (was: Language Niches (long))

Cameron Laird claird at starbase.neosoft.com
Mon Jul 30 15:21:45 CEST 2001


In article <mailman.996442753.17197.python-list at python.org>,
Paul Prescod  <paulp at ActiveState.com> wrote:
			.
			.
			.
>Python are certainly not mature. In particular, many people use Python
>today in radically different ways than they would have five years ago
>(in particular much bigger projects). They make certain demands on
			.
			.
			.
This illustration interests me.

Without contesting any of Paul's larger points, what
are the facts here?  I believe:
* Python is good for team-work
  and big projects; and
* There is increasing recogni-
  tion and use of Python in
  this role.
What role has "language change" played in this, though?
I don't think Python's syntax or semantics support
modularization and packaging significantly better than
in '96 (Paul, do you have a Jython point in mind?).
Does performance improvement in hardware which makes
raw speed less frequently a constraint constitute a
"language change"?
-- 

Cameron Laird <claird at NeoSoft.com>
Business:  http://www.Phaseit.net
Personal:  http://starbase.neosoft.com/~claird/home.html



More information about the Python-list mailing list