Monty Python (was: Freeware Python editor)

Tim Hammerquist tim at vegeta.ath.cx
Fri Nov 2 00:12:01 CET 2001


Me parece que Grant Edwards <grante at visi.com> dijo:
>  In article <3BE18C8E.D9E75CD4 at ix.netcom.com>, Antaeus Feldspar wrote:
> > Even some of those [Monty Python sketches] were much funnier at the
> > time because the audience understood the references being made.
>  
>  I think some of the humor is lost on us Americans due to to the
>  cultural references that go flying past without comprehension
>  (assuming we can actually catch all of the dialog to begin
>  with).  I thought the one German episode was still fairly funny
>  when subtitled...

You mean "the humour is lost on _some of_ us Americans," right?  

Of course, I had a non-standard American growth in which I was exposed
to many things British, including but not
limited to:
    Dr. Who (mainly Tom Baker) (recorded).
    Red Dward (1st season, carrier did not renew) (recorded).
    Monty Python's Flying Circus and any of the movies I could find.
    How to Irritate People (John Cleese et al.; not "officially" Monty
        Python). (purchased)
    ...et cetera.
    Peter Cushing horror movies.  ;)
    Susan Cooper's The Dark Is Rising sequence including dialects from
        Cornwall and Wales.
    A great many movies and series taking place in Yorkshire, probably
        responsible for my ability to understand more dialects than
        usual.  :)
    Neil Gaiman novels.  :)
    Far too many others to count.

In any case, the humour was not lost on this American.  Nor did it
appear to have been lost on our BDFL, Mr. van Rossum.

Many foreigners call America's culture (or lack thereof) bland.  Well,
from this American's perspective, they tend to be correct.

My $0.03,
Tim Hammerquist
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