The perfect Python

Pekka Niiranen krissepu at vip.fi
Wed Aug 28 21:13:10 CEST 2002


Instead of the features you listed I think developers should
concentrate more on speeding up the execution of Python code.
The trend of making C -extensions for the sake of the cleaner syntax
does not make sense: are we to convert all the existing C-code to Python
callable procedures? What happens to the maintainability of this
kind of  "Python" -code?

Beautiful syntax but no oomph.
           
-pekka-

Jean-François Ménard wrote:

>First, a warning:
>    - I'm very poor in english.
>    - I woke up way too early this morning.
>    - It's a long post... (Sorry!)
>    - I *love* python. This is not a troll, or anything like that.
>
>Ok. Here we go.
>
>I would like to share my impressions and my comments on Python.  At the end,
>I will propose what would be for me the *perfect* Python interpreter.
>
>Background:
>
>I'm working on a fairly big Python (Zope) project since a year and a half.
>It's a content management system for a big (19 000 employees) entreprise.
>At first, I was the sole developper for the project.  My orders were: "Ok,
>choose what you want, do what you want.  We just want one thing: results..."
>Lucky, hey? ;)
>
>I had experience in Object Pascal (Delphi), Vb (...), C++ and Java.  I was
>new in the company, and wanted to impress my bosses.  After some research, I
>narrowed my choices to two options: EJB (Java) and Zope (Python).
>
>I gave a serious look at EJB, but in the end, I chose Python.  I took a
>risk.  I don't regret it.  After only 2 months, I had already produced a
>working system.  Alone... :)
>
>Opinions, impressions:
>
>At first, I was amazed by the simplicity and the clarity of the syntax. I
>*love* the indentation style.  It gives clean and standardized source code.
>We are now three developpers on the project, and it's easy for anyone of us
>to understand the code of the others.
>
>But...
>
>As project grew up, I started to see some of the limitations of the
>language.  I understand that Python was not designed for such big projects.
>But it's so powerfull, so clean, that I just wonder what Python could become
>with just some (ok, not so minors...) improvements.
>
>I understand that backward compatibility is important too, but the latests
>extensions to Python begin to seem locked by past decisions.  I don't like
>this tendency to __this__ and __that__ everything.  We loose in readability,
>accessibility and clarity, in my opinion...
>
>The Perfect Python (c):
>
>What is missing ?  Well, I'm not a language designer, but I can say what *I*
>miss.
>
>    - Interfaces.  Behavior checking is not enough.
>    - Private and Public scopes.  Explicitly.  No more __name_mangling
>    - Design by contract. Pre and Post conditions.  Could save hours of
>debugging.
>    - Block comments.  """ """ should be for documentation.
>    - Class variables.
>    - A cleaner Property declaration.  No separate _variable. Saw too many
>newbie posts about that.
>    - No more self in functions declarations.  In OOP, this *can* be
>implicit. (I know, this is controversial stuff)
>    - Standard GUI library.  AnyGui seems to be the solution, but
>development seems to have stalled recently...
>
>I tried to write an example of what Perfect Python(c) could look like.  It's
>not valid code (duh!),  and it does'nt try to do anything unless give a
>sample syntax:
>********************
>from package1.package2 import module1, module2
>
>public interface MyInterface implements (OtherInterface1, OtherInterface2):
>    """ Comments """
>    private PrivateClassVariable
>    public property MyProperty
>    public MyFunction(param1, param2)
>
>public class MyClass(Class1, Class2) implements MyInterface, Interface2:
>    """ Comments """
>
>    # Instance Variable
>    private InstanceVariable = "Default"
>
>    # Class Variable - Public by default
>    static PublicClassVariable = "Default"
>
>    # Class Variable - Private
>    static private PrivateClassVariable = "Default"
>
>    public initialize(param1, param2="", param3=None):
>        """ Comments """
>        # OtherInstanceVariable is Public by default
>        self.OtherInstanceVariable = "rien"
>
>        # OtherInstanceVariable2 - Private
>        private self.OtherInstanceVariable = "rien"
>
>    private MyFunction(MyParameter1, MyParameter1):
>        """ Comments """
>        return "Result"
>
>    /*
>        Block comment
>
>        function Foo():
>            pass
>    */
>
>    public property MyProperty:
>        """ Comments """
>        get():
>            """ Comments """
>            return self.MyProperty
>        set(newValue):
>            """ Comments """
>            self.MyProperty = newValue
>
>    private testInterface(otherObject):
>        """ Interface checking  """
>        # Check for interface implementation
>        if otherObject implements MyInterface:
>            return true
>
>        # Check for multiple interface implementation
>        if otherObject implements (OtherInterface1 or OtherInterface2):
>            return true
>
>        # Check for class inheritance
>        if otherObject implements MyInterface:
>            return true
>
>        return false
>
>    private testInheritence(otherObject):
>        """ Inheritence checking """
>        # Check for class inheritance
>        if otherObject implements MyInterface:
>            return true
>
>    private propertyCall():
>        """ Uniform call """
>        return self.MyProperty
>
>    private propertySet(newValue):
>        """ Uniform call """
>        self.MyProperty = "new value"
>
>    public functionWithAssertion(Param1):
>        """ Design by Contract """
>        require:
>            """ Precondition """
>            Param1 < 1000000
>        do:
>            """ Function body """
>            pass
>        ensure:
>            """ Poscondition """
>            Param1 < 1000000
>
>********************
>I have no idea how this could be implemented.  Maybe a PerfectPython
>interpretor could be developped on top of the standard interpretor?
>
>Any comments?  Anybody interested to start the project? ;)
>
>




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