Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?

Alex Martelli aleax at aleax.it
Thu Jan 3 13:23:54 CET 2002


"maxm" <maxm at mxm.dk> wrote in message
news:jlXY7.7482$aS.1196809 at news010.worldonline.dk...
> From: "Paul Boddie" <paul at boddie.net>
>
> > [Relocate to Norway?]
> > > What are the taxes like?<g>
    ...
> But in Denmark it's close to 80% including VAT and other more hidden
taxes!

According to http://database.townhall.com/heritage/index/country.cfm?ID= ...
with the ID values for various countries:

Country    top income tax rate    average taxpayer's marginal tax rate

Denmark    59                        46
Sweden     56                        20
France     54                        33
Germany    51                        35.4
Canada     48.75                     26        includes Federal and
Provincial
Italy      46                        34
Norway     41.5                      28
UK         40                        23
USA        39.6                      28        NB Federal taxes only
Finland    38                        25.5

So, Norway ain't too bad -- indeed, you might be better off there than
in some US states, depending on varying State-level taxation of income.
Denmark, as maxm indicates, is indeed by far costliest, while Finland
has a very attractive fiscal regime for individual earners.

Of course, VAT and/or sales taxes also vary widely, and may influence
your fiscal position, depending on what portion of your income you plan
to *spend* (as opposed to saving/investing), and spend where.  I believe
they're not too far from 20% in various European states, lower in North
America (down to no sales taxes at all in some US States).  Similarly
for other taxes, e.g. on real estate, depending in this case where you
plan to live (direct effect on property, indirect on rents), and other
taxes depending on your planned consumption patterns.  E.g., I believe that
Denmark has by far the highest tax rate of the listed countries on car
purchases, and all European countries have high tax rates on car fuel,
but on the other hand public transportation may enjoy net "negative taxes"
(subsidies) so that you pay less for your bus tickets than their fair
market price (in the US, this widely varies, by city even more than by
State).  Decisions about where to earn, where to spend, where to live,
etc, are strongly correlated, but not entirely so (around borders, it's
quite normal for people to live/work/spend in different fiscal areas --
e.g., there are large shopping areas in New Hampshire just across the
border from Massachussets... guess why!-).


Alex






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