Visual Basic - Python compare

GerritM gmuller at worldonline.nl
Tue Apr 29 21:15:30 CEST 2003


<achrist at easystreet.com> schreef in bericht
news:3EAEC78E.9D51D668 at easystreet.com...
> When attempting to introduce a new programming language into a
> corporate shop, you've got to look at it from the manager's
> side.
>
Yes, very true. I have written a how-to for architects:
"How to present architecture issues to higher management"
http://www.extra.research.philips.com/natlab/sysarch/ArchitectManagementInte
ractionPaper.pdf

> 1. There is a tremendous potential downside to having any language
> in your shop if you have fewer than 3 fluent developers.
>
> 2. If you introduce a new language, you hope that it will succeed and
> be used in your shop for 5-10 years.
>
> 3. Multiply (1) times (2) and you see that the decision to introduce
> a new language is well into a seven-figure $US investment.
>

This is of course only true from the ill-informed fearful manager.

<...snip..>
>
> 6. The way to counter all of this in favor of Python is to make the
> case that fewer lines of code result in much lower maintenance cost,
> so that those who look beyond the short-term see benefits and not
> costs.  One thing that might be interesting to try would be to take
> a VB application from 1995 or so (16-bit Win 3.1) and see how easy it
> is to get it running under the current version of VB, ie VB.Net.  Then
> take a python version 1.4 app and bring it up to verson 2.3.  I believe
> that python will look pretty good in this comparison.
>
Yes, working by example, supported by hard facts (numbers!) preferably
transformable in MegaDollars is an effective way.

> Al

regards Gerrit

--
www.extra.research.philips.com/natlab/sysarch/







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