Summer reading list

Bengt Richter bokr at oz.net
Tue Aug 12 17:28:54 CEST 2003


On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 06:57:05 GMT, "Raymond Hettinger" <vze4rx4y at verizon.net> wrote:

>Found in a pamphlet at a pre-school:
>---------------------------------------
>Reading improves vocabulary
>Reading raises cultural literacy through shared knowledge
>Reading develops writing skills
>Reading opens the mind to new ways of understanding
>Reading is fun
>
>
>Accordingly, I suggest the following works of literature:
>
>   * heapq.py         (255 lines)
>   * sets.py          (536 lines)
>   * textwrap.py      (355 lines)
>   * csv.py           (427 lines)
>
>These make enjoyable reading, cover interesting topics/algorithms,
>demonstrate superb modern python technique, and showcase
>effective use of Python's newer features.
>
>Learn from the masters:
>   Pinard, O'Connor, Peters, Wilson, Martelli, van Rossum,
>   Ward, Montanaro, Altis, Drake, and others
>
Thanks for the nudge. It reminds me: I've wondered if a Python Reading Club
could work. I.e., with agreed-upon reading schedule and discussion, like some
folks do with non-technical stuff.

Anyway, it might be a good nudge to get me to read the module docs I haven't
yet looked at, or cpython sources, or ... sigh, not enough time ;-/

As a byproduct, IWT it could yield a lot of doc usability info and ideas for
improvement. Maybe people would be motivated to rewrite selected paragraphs.
Maybe there could be a wiki for this kind of thing, so they could just do it
when the motivation was hot.

There could be different level groups for different interests, e.g., for
tutorial reading vs metaclass arcana vs C extensions vs threading, vs
review of all the __xxx__ definitions, or other systematic topic coverage, etc.

The only trouble is finding time for everything.

Regards,
Bengt Richter




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