Python's biggest compromises

Andy C ayc8NOSPAM at cornell.edu
Sun Aug 3 01:31:44 CEST 2003


OK, then unless I'm missing something, tabs vs. spaces shouldn't matter for
you.  The editor should be able to handle tabs in a satisfactory manner as
well.

> I'm used to a certain minimum standard from my editors, and smart
> tabs are one of those things that's part of the price of admission these
> days, just like syntax highlighting. A programming editor's job is to help
> where it's useful, and get out of the way when it's not. When you want
> to indent, you hit the tab button. It's the editor's job to know I want,
> for example, four spaces, and deliver them. In Python, it's the editor's
> job to know that when I hit return at the end of a line, there are only
one
> or two legitimate places to put the cursor on the next line, and to put
> it in the most likely of them.
>
> As to the different number of spaces between developers, that's
> another thing I'd expect from my editors. It's easy enough in Python
> to figure out what's an indent and infer the number of spaces. I'd
> expect a decent editor to be able to load a program and tell me
> what the indentation policy was! I'd also expect to be able to tell
> it to change it, and have it automatically reindent the program for
> me.
>
> John Roth
>
>






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