Is anyone using Python for .NET?

Brandon J. Van Every try_vanevery_at_mycompanyname at yahoo.com
Thu Dec 18 05:44:43 CET 2003


"Richard Brodie" <R.Brodie at rl.ac.uk> wrote in message
news:brpop1$1636 at newton.cc.rl.ac.uk...
>
> That said, Brandon's claim was fairly contentious and likely to get
> someone to bite. It's a well worn debate though, and c.l.py probably
> isn't the best place to renew it.

It was a comment made in passing, and it takes quite a Trollhunter to make
it otherwise.  My motives for posting were quite explicit, and I could care
less whether anyone wants to call .NET "a clone" or not.  You can call it a
sheep or a dog or a rock for all I care.  You can debate it until the cows
come home for all I care, I just want to know if people are using Python for
.NET.

Again in passing: the concept of .NET was of course based on Java and a
number of other higher level languages.  Every book on the subject I've read
says so (which by now is a small handful), and the goal (aside from
Microsoft dominating the world as usual) was to improve upon the basic
premise of a virtual machine.  They have been successful and the truth
stands: the Unix world is cloning .NET because it is a superior technology
for a certain class of language interop problem.  It remains to be seen
whether the *Windows Forms* part of .NET will be cloned successfully, or is
desired by the Unix crowd.  I'm referring mainly to the IL.

Why bother to make another comment in passing?  Because it's the truth, and
I find it annoying to be labeled as trying to get people to "bite" on some
advocacy debate when it's not my motive.  If you want to debate the
relevance or morality of it all, go talk to the Mono people.  Right now, I
don't care.  I'm going to wait 4 years and then run .NET on Unix, picking up
a residual and unimportant market of Linux gamers for very little effort.
Sooner if things develop quicker.

-- 
Cheers,                          www.indiegamedesign.com
Brandon Van Every                Seattle, WA

Brandon's Law (after Godwin's Law):
"As a Usenet discussion grows longer, the probability of
a person being called a troll approaches one RAPIDLY."





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