Books: Core Python Programming vs. Python Cookbook

Sean Ross sross at connectmail.carleton.ca
Tue Jan 7 14:13:54 CET 2003


I'm not very familiar with "Core Python", though I have browsed through it.

I own the "Python Cookbook" and I'm very happy with it.
It fits very neatly into one part of your criteria -

>  Mostly I want
> something to which I can refer for ideas on how to do things better
> and examples of things I never knew were possible (or at least I never
> knew were simpler than they sound).

And, it does cover some Tkinter, network programming, etc. But it does not
cover these topics in depth.
Also,  it is available for free online. Personally, I prefer to read from a
book which is why I bought a copy.
But the same material, plus new submissions are available at
     aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/Python/Cookbook/
in case your interested.

For greater coverage of Tkinter, network programming, etc., I'd recommend
     "Programming Python, 2nd Ed.", by Mark Lutz.
It's a bit dated now, but it's still got a lot of code on a lot of subjects.
Unfortunately, it is pretty expensive so, if money is an issue, this may be
a problem.

Oh, and for Tkinter in particular, I'd recommend "Python and Tkinter", by
John E. Grayson.
But, again, you've only got so much money...

So, in a nutshell (which should be out soon I hope,  ;)  ),
I'd say if you have the money get "Programming Python, 2nd Ed." otherwise
get "Python Cookbook".
The only thing I can say about "Core Python" is it did not convince me to
purchase it.

OK, good luck and have fun,
Sean

"Neil MacMillan" <sir_penguin.geo at yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:f774ba3f.0301062029.721ede80 at posting.google.com...
> I'm a 1st year computer science student, but I've been teaching myself
> Python as my first useful programming language on and off for over a
> year and a half.  I'm confident that I know the basic programming
> concepts and Python-specific concepts, and I'm slowly working my way
> through GUI programming now.  I don't know about threading, sockets,
> and similar things that aren't applicable to a broad range of
> applications.
>
> I'm looking for a book in which I can find explanations and examples
> for things like Tkinter, network programming in Python, etc.  Topics
> that are covered in the official tutorial aren't necessary, but my
> intelligence won't be insulted if they're there.  Mostly I want
> something to which I can refer for ideas on how to do things better
> and examples of things I never knew were possible (or at least I never
> knew were simpler than they sound).
>
> I've been going to the Chapters store and reading Core Python for
> explanations of specific things that I needed to know, but the other
> day I looked at Python Cookbook, which seemed interesting too.
> Unfortunately, Chapters recently took Core Python off the shelf, so I
> can't compare them myself.  Chapters.ca has a 30% off sale, and I got
> a $20 gift certificate for my birthday, so I can afford one or the
> other (I might be able to make myself afford both if necessary, but I
> won't count on it).  They're about the same price, so sadly I can't
> decide on that basis.  If you please, which one would you recommend,
> and why?  Would it be worth getting both?






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