Newbie: changing an attribute of objects in a list

Steven Taschuk staschuk at telusplanet.net
Thu Jun 12 19:15:47 CEST 2003


Quoth Ben Simuyandi:
> Example objects in a list [a,b,...,i]:
  [...]

Thanks!

There's two things I don't understand in your examples.  One in
each, tidily enough.

In the first example, where all items start with .order == 1 and
the output is supposed to be

    a.age == 100    a.order == 9
    b.age == 200    b.order == 6
    c.age == 300    c.order == 5
    d.age == 400    d.order == 4
    e.age == 500    e.order == 3
    f.age == 600    f.order == 2
    g.age == 50     g.order == 9
    h.age == 700    h.order == 1
    i.age == 150    i.order == 7

why do a and g get the same .order?  I'd expected that we want
g.order == 9 and a.order == 8.

Then the second example, where we start with

    [...]
    d.age == 400    d.order == 4
    e.age == 500    e.order == 4
    f.age == 600    f.order == 5
    g.age == 50     g.order == 6
    h.age == 700    h.order == 7
    i.age == 150    i.order == 8

and are to produce

    [...]
    d.age == 400    d.order == 4
    e.age == 500    e.order == 5
    f.age == 600    f.order == 6
    g.age == 50     g.order == 7
    h.age == 700    h.order == 8
    i.age == 150    i.order == 9

Again the handling of g puzzles me.  Here's my thinking:

    1) d and e both have order 4; since d.age < e.age, we let d have
    order 4 and bump e up to order 5.

    2) Then e and f both have order 5; since e.age < f.age, we let e
    have order 5 and bump f up to order 6.

    3) Then f and g both have order 6.  In the example posted, f gets
    order 6 and g gets bumped up to order 7.  But f.age > g.age, so I
    expected g to take precedence for order 6.

What's going on here?  I'm baffled.

-- 
Steven Taschuk                               staschuk at telusplanet.net
"[T]rue greatness is when your name is like ampere, watt, and fourier
 -- when it's spelled with a lower case letter."      -- R.W. Hamming





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