pyAlbum

Josiah Carlson jcarlson at nospam.uci.edu
Sun Feb 29 21:04:10 CET 2004


Your presentation is inaccurate.

http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide3.jpg.htm

Python /is not a derivative, nor a successor/ to ABC.  To know why, read 
the following two articles:
http://www.artima.com/intv/python.html
http://www.artima.com/intv/pyscale.html


http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide6.jpg.htm

Portable: works on any platform with a decent C compiler, or platforms 
with Java support (via Jython).
I also believe it is byte-code compiled whenever possible (user can 
write to the filesystem).

http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide8.jpg.htm

At the command line:
C:\winnt>python
Python 2.2.2 (#37, Oct 14 2002, 17:02:34) [MSC 32 bit (Intel)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
 >>> print "hello"
hello


http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide10.jpg.htm

One thing to note, raw_input only returns strings.  C++'s cin can read 
ints, floats, etc.


http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide15.jpg.htm
http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide27.jpg.htm

It is extremely bad form to use the name 'str' in any context.  Also, 
slicing is usable on any sequence; lists, strings, tuples, or really any 
class with a __getslice__ method.

Perhaps you need to read up on the difference between mutable and 
immutable sequences, it would make discussion about them easier.
http://www.python.org/doc/current/lib/typesseq.html


http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide18.jpg.htm

Suggests that only strings can be used as keys.  Reality is that any 
immutable type can be used as a key; strings, tuples, integers, floats, 
types themselves.  You can also nest them with tuples, ('hello', 5, int)


http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide22.jpg.htm
http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide28.jpg.htm

No need for functional semantics on returns, using "return val" is 
sufficient.


http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide23.jpg.htm

if <expression>:
     statements
elif <expression>:
     statements
else:
     statements


http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide24.jpg.htm

Parenthesis not required for 'while' loops, or really any conditional 
expression, unless you need to be explicit about operation associations.


http://www24.brinkster.com/premshree/python-seminar-210204/slides/pySlide30.jpg.htm

Python classes can contain almost anything your heart desires.  Static 
and dynamic class and instance variables are all possible.



Some fairly rudimentary fact-checking would have prevented the 
errors/oversights listed above.
  - Josiah



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