Brent Ashley's JavaScript remote scripting (JSRS)

Harald harald.nyman at astrazeneca.com
Tue Mar 9 19:29:12 CET 2004


I'd say it works. Caveats, like Bob says - may become browser-dependent.
Have done a few of these, with JavaScript + a small applet in the page.
(Not JSRS, though (not even HTTP..))

1) Page with a progress bar + some status fields to be updated w/o refresh.
   Uses a small Python socket server, polled by the applet.
2) Web app with ~15 pages created by Python+CGI. Slow, as Python starts and
   imports modules for each page. Instead of CGI, we tried a threaded Twisted
   TCP server, started once, importing everything. Ok, not "interactive page",
   but _fast_. Tricky things were handling cookies + form data; these are
   compiled by JavaScript into 'dictionaries' (text), eval'ed by Python.
3) File manager. Backend is a servlet (this was before I met Python :),
   handling file/directory operations, and sending back HTML to the applet,
   which updates the page dynamically. Very interactive.

Harald

Bob Ippolito <bob at redivi.com> wrote in message news:<2004022913082827544%bob at redivicom>...
> On 2004-02-29 12:50:27 -0500, piedmontbiz at aol.com (PiedmontBiz) said:
> 
> > I am looking for ways to do interactive web pages with python as a backend.
> > 
> > I ran across serveral articles on Brent Ashley's JavaScript remote scripting
> > (JSRS) locateded at http://www.ashleyit.com/rs/
> > 
> > This package allows a client web browser to transfer data to and from the
> > server without loading reloading pages.... as I understand it. The resulting
> > "application" would be have like a desktop application.
> > 
> > I downloaded and am now studying the code.
> > There are no demos with a web page calling a python script but I am going to
> > whip something up soon.
> > 
> > Anyone with any experience with this? Does it really work? Any caveats?
> 
> There is something like this in Twisted called LivePage.. and a newer 
> version in Nevow called Evil something or another :)  I don't believe 
> either has the kind of compatibility matrix that JSRS does, though.
> 
> The biggest caveat really is that it's now a javascript application, 
> not a web page, and not all browsers are created equally.
> 
> -bob



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