AI Mind (Was: Sound capture)

David Milne djomilne at hotmail.com
Wed Oct 6 04:34:45 CEST 2004


Yes I hear that the AI people after more than half a century have discovered
that doing Chess is "easy"and that tying your shoe laces, cutting a slice of
bread or picking a pretty flower is very very "hard".

A touch typer's skills "reside" in the fingers. On a practical level the
mind seems to have an intimite intertwining with the body at many levels.

Yea, I think that a project for a disembodied mind developed as a plug-in
for an uminded body has near zero prospects outside a very "toy world":-(


"Chris Malcolm" <cam at holyrood.ed.ac.uk> wrote in message
news:cjuesr$gjb$1 at scotsman.ed.ac.uk...
> uj797 at victoria.tc.ca (Arthur T. Murray) writes:
>
> >"Chris S." writes on Fri, 30 Jul 2004:
>
> >The sensorium is where we amateur mind-makers count on
> >help from the amateur robot-makers. They want a mind
> >for their robots; we want robots for our AI to live in.
>
> Modularly separating the design for mind and body in this way supposes
> a) that it is possible, i.e., mind design does not lie athwart body
> and brain design, and b), given that supposition, that the assumptions
> you have made about the nature of the interface are workable.
>
> A growing number of roboticists, AI researchers, and philosophers of
> mind argue that mind design *does* lie athwart brain and body
> design. If they're right your project is doomed.
> --
> Chris Malcolm cam at infirmatics.ed.ac.uk +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
> IPAB,  Informatics,  JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
> [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
>





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