python is going to die! =(

Hans Nowak hans at zephyrfalcon.org
Mon Sep 20 05:17:57 CEST 2004


julio wrote:

With a subject like that, you don't really need to read the message to figure 
out that it's an obvious troll.  I don't want to feed it, but between all the 
"crap" and "retarded" rhetoric, some actual points can be discerned.  A few 
comments are in order...

> What does c# .net has that python doesnt ? (significant features) 
> 
> -- tools,tools,tools : have people that likes python ever used an ide? i
> mean a good ide, the one that saves you a lot of time, and makes you
> productive.

Such an IDE will only make you significantly more productive if the language is 
inherently *UN*productive.  There's a reason full-fledged IDEs are popular with 
languages like Java and C# and less popular with Python.  I haven't done much 
Java programming, but when I did, I was constantly looking up stuff (classes, 
methods, types, etc); in that kind of environment, code completion, tooltips 
etc are very useful.  Without them, programming in these languages is (even 
more of) a pain.  In Python, I don't very often need to look things up, and if 
I do, the interactive interpreter can be a great help.  As a result, a text 
editor suffices for most Python programming, even for large projects.  (Some 
people might want to use an IDE anyway, but that is mostly a matter of 
preference, not of necessity.)

>  -- C # is almost perfetly designed, python is very well designed but it has
> some crap that obscurize it and is not going to be removed because of the
> damn backwards compatibility thing, 

The "damn backwards compatibility thing" guarantees that older Python code 
still runs, more or less unchanged, on recent interpreters.  (Well, most of the 
time.)

>  -- C # is easy to use,fast apps coding (as python) but!! it has all the
> advantages of a compiled language , like less bugs concerning silly types
> mistakes , ides and tools can take much much more advantage of static
> typing , it is much much much faster , and finally is much more readable
> than python since i dont have to be guessing in the woods to know what type
> of value a function return , or what types are the functions argument or
> WTF does 'return MOM' means?

This is only an issue if you think the actual types of things are important. 
Code like

   def foo(x, y):
       x.this()
       y.that()

doesn't *need* types.  All Python cares about is that x has the this() method, 
and that y has the that() method.  The actual types are unimportant.  This is 
an important difference from languages like C# (and Java, ObjectPascal, C++, 
yadda yadda), and allows for entirely different coding styles and design.  If 
you think this is a problem or a deficiency, then you don't understand what 
Python (or dynamic languages in general, really) is all about.

> -- C # is killing python, first the gnome guys dont know what to choose for
> their core system development , if mono-C # ? or java ? the only reason C #
> hasnt being choosen is because of legal issues, and java? well it realy
> sucks so no surprise , but is considered just because eclipse wich is the
> most kick ass ide ever. AND they dont even consider python for a high level
> language to choose!!

If they're choosing between Java and C#, they were obviously not interested in 
high-level languages.  Also, the article you mention in another post 
(http://news.zdnet.co.uk/software/applications/0,39020384,39166682,00.htm) says:

"""Waugh conceded that the decision to move to a higher level programming 
language is partly a political one. Two major corporate backers of the GNOME 
project have competing technologies -- Novell with the Mono project and Sun 
Microsystems with Java."""

--
Hans Nowak (hans at zephyrfalcon.org)
http://zephyrfalcon.org/




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