Announcing PyCs, a new Python-like language on .Net

EP EP at zomething.com
Thu Sep 2 08:19:25 CEST 2004


Jeremy Bowers commented:

> Basically, all the *really* cute Py* names are taken. I'd recommend doing
> something that cleanly separates you from Python, and then just note the
> descendance. The farther you are getting from an implementation of Python,
> the more true this becomes. I think you will actually come to regret the
> association if you make it too strong, as people will get ideas about your
> language from the association, then be upset about the language when it
> doesn't meet their expectations. Better to start fresh.


My .02:

First, why do you feel the need to create a new programming language?!  If we wanted to be around innovation, do you thnk we'd work and play in IT?  ;-)

Re: "fresh" above: +1... and

Naming is a fun exercise if you have time for it, and I'd suggest if you are going to sink your time into developing a programming language, you cannot afford not to spend the time on the name.  

Free associate, go to the beach or mountains, make love, ride a bicycle, stand on your head, go to a concert.  Let ideas come to you without judging them (or requiring a "py" in them!)  Gather names, toss them around more later unitl one  grabs you, sticks with you.  

The name is actually the "brand" of the language; if you have high aspirations, you'll want a good brand flag to pursue them under.

"Groovy" is a good name
"Python" is a better name than "Perl"
"Java" was a good name that seemed to make a difference
"Prothon" (no offense intended) was a name with a prententious sound
"Javascript" was a terrible name and hurt the "Java" name
"Javascript" beat the hell out of "ECMAscript"
"FORTRAN" is a solid name, and the language survives still
"LISP" is a name you'd almost want to explain to people, like the language is only for insiders

"XML", "PHP", and "CSS" work (barely) because they have so few letters; but are they names, are they really brands?

XHTML, OASIS, XSD, RDF, XDR, XSL, XSLT, XQL --- these have no brand power at all.  And I have to think about each to remember what it does and how it fits in.

"SOAP" is a better name than "XML-RPC", but it would be better if it was "Soap"

If you can't come up with a good name, use a letter and symbol or three (but no more than 3), e.g. C, C++, C#.  Such will be non-objectionable, but will not help you in getting your language/technology adopted, or even remembered.

Unfiltered ideas offered (30 seconds worth): Ray, Fish, V, Box, Fresh, Rotten, Spin, Tube, Hat, Bone, Gin, Clean, Tack, Pirate, Cell, Root, Open, Dove...

You can do better than those, but those might be better (I'd say are definitely better) than Pycs or Pyxs or whatever you said (which, hint, hint, I can not remember).

MS can get away with naming its languages _anything_.  They don't need to market to you.  You just need to comply with them.  ;-)  .... you WILL assimilate...


What you name your language will have at least a subconscious impact on its future.

As for domain name availability... screw the domain hogs, people can find you under something other than a .com or .org.  If your new language (let's say "Bone") gains real traction and becomes a force, you may be able to acquire "Bone.com" or "Bone.org" later.  The name is the brand and should not be driven by domain availability.

Concept=>Brand=>Name=>URL

cheers and good luck!


Eric Pederson
Chief Brandfoo, Waddiz!




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