up to date books?

Jon Hewer jonhewer at gmail.com
Thu Aug 18 11:21:21 CEST 2005


mark pilgrim's dive into python is a good book if you're new to python

i also have python cookbook, and foundations of python network
programming - i haven't really had a chance to look at these in detail
yet but both of these look good

On 8/18/05, Paul Dale <pd at traxon.com> wrote:
> 
> I highly recommend the "Safari" library service from Oreilly (
> http://safari.oreilly.com ) you can check out all of the books listed
> below and about 10,000 more. The library contains much more than just
> Oreilly's books, but they are, of course, all in there.
> 
> The first 2 weeks is free after that it's $20/month. You can check out
> 10 books at a time and you have to keep them for a month. You can
> download chapters, print pages, and search all the books in the library,
> as well as search across books you've checked out.
> 
> It's a great way to get access to a broad range of technical books.
> 
> One thing to be careful of. As the old books are there too it's possible
> to grab a first version when you might want a second or third version.
> Always list by date and make sure you're looking at the new stuff.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Paul
> 
> Adriaan Renting wrote:
> 
> >I learned Python from the "Learning Python" book that's first on Alessandros list. If you have the Second Edition, that includes coverage for Python 2.3, I think you have quite a nice introductory book.
> >As a reference book "Python in a Nutshell" and of course the Python documentation itself are quite good.
> >
> >Adriaan
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >>>>Alessandro Bottoni <alessandro.bottoni at infinito.it> 08/18/05 9:02 am >>>
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >John Salerno wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> >>hi all. are there any recommendations for an intro book to python that
> >>is up-to-date for the latest version?
> >>
> >>
> >
> >I do not know how much up-to-date they are but I have to suggest you these
> >books:
> >
> >- Learning Python
> >By Mark Lutz and David Ascher
> >published by O'Reilly
> >Most likely the best introductory book on Python
> >
> >- Python Cookbook
> >By Alex Martelli and David Ascher
> >published by O'Reilly
> >By far the most useful book on Python after your first week of real use of
> >this language
> >
> >Also, the fundamental
> >- Programming Python (the 2nd edition ONLY)
> >By Mark Lutz
> >published by O'Reilly
> >Is very useful for understanding the most inner details of Python
> >
> >
> >
> >>would reading a book from a year or two ago cause me to miss much?
> >>
> >>
> >
> >No. Python did not changed too much since rel. 1.5. You can still use a book
> >published in 2001 as a introductory book (as I do). The changes are
> >exhaustively described both in the official documentation and in the very
> >fine "what's new in..." articles written by Andrew Kuchlin for every new
> >release (see www.python.org).
> >
> >CU
> >
> >-----------------------------------
> >Alessandro Bottoni
> >
> >
> --
> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
>



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