is this pythonic?

Chris Lambacher lambacck at computer.org
Sat Jul 23 05:57:45 CEST 2005


On Thu, Jul 21, 2005 at 10:27:24AM -0400, Bill Mill wrote:
> On 7/21/05, Steven D'Aprano <steve at removethiscyber.com.au> wrote:
> > On Wed, 20 Jul 2005 16:30:10 -0400, Bill Mill wrote:
> > 
> > > On 7/20/05, Simon Brunning <simon.brunning at gmail.com> wrote:
> > >> On 7/20/05, Mage <mage at mage.hu> wrote:
> > >> > Or is there better way?
> > >> >
> > >> > for (i, url) in [(i,links[i]) for i in range(len(links))]:
> > >>
> > >> for i, url in enumerate(links):
> > >>
> > >
> > > +2 for creating seeing a need and crafting a reasonable solution, but
> > > -1 for not reading the section on builtins to see if it existed
> > > already.
> > 
> > To see if *what* existed already?
> > 
> > It is well and good to say RTFM, but there are 697 subsections to the
> > Python Library reference, and if you don't know what you are looking for,
> > and beginners rarely are, it isn't obvious which is the right section to
> > read. And the Library Reference isn't even "the" manual: there is also the
> > global module reference and language reference.
> > 
> > If you already know what you are looking for, reading the manual is great
> > advice. Browsing the manual looking for interesting tidbits can even be
> > fun for a certain mindset. But if you don't know enough to know what to
> > look for, where in the 2000-odd sections of the Python references will
> > you find it?
> > 
> 
> I said the *builtins* section. I think you learn pretty quick that
> figuring out what functions are builtins is pretty important in every
> language. There's a fair number of people out there giving the advice
> to read chapter 2 of the library reference cover-to-cover for a good
> starter on python.
The quick reference guide is also a nice place to find all the most important
information:
http://rgruet.free.fr/PQR24/PQR2.4.html
> 
> Furthermore, I wasn't being hard on the guy, he still added up to +1.
> Lighten up, I was joking.
> 
> > 
> > 
> > > (As for its pythonicity, I would have recommended isolating it into a
> > > function and making it a generator:
> > 
> > It is easy to take this to extremes. It isn't necessary to isolate
> > everything into its own object, or class, or module. Too much
> > encapsulation is just as bad as too little.
> > 
> 
> agreed; his listcomp just looks awkward inside the for loop statement;
> if it were my code, I would put it into a function. He asked if his
> code was pythonic, and I think the (non-extreme) pythonic thing to do
> would be to put his listcomp into a function.
> 
> > 
> > > def my_enumerate(enumerable):
> > >     i = 0
> > >     for elt in enumerable:
> > >         yield (i, elt)
> > >         i += 1
> > >
> > > for i, url in my_enumerate(links):
> > >
> > > but it's not too bad as it is. Also, my function is completely
> > > untested - it's close to right though.)
> > 
> > What is the advantage of your function my_enumerate over the Python
> > built-in enumerate?
> > 
> > 
> 
> absolutely none; I just was saying how I would encapsulate it into a function.

Except that enumerate was introduced in 2.3 so if you are working with an
older version of Python it won't be there.
> 
> Peace
> Bill Mill
> bill.mill at gmail.com
> -- 
> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list



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