Continuous system simulation in Python

Nicolas Pernetty nicopernetty at nowhere.fr
Sat Oct 8 23:31:40 CEST 2005


Simulink is well fitted for small simulators, but when you run into big
projects, I find many shortcomings appears which made the whole thing
next to unusable for our kind of projects.

That's why I'm interested in Python by the way, it is not a simple clone
like Scilab/Scicos. It is a real language which bring its own
advantages, and its own shortcomings, which I find well suited for our
activity.

If you want, I can send you a paper I wrote last year, detailing all
Simulink shortcomings. I doubt that this mailing list is interested in
such things...(and it's in French...).

Concerning Scilab/Scicos, I'm not really interested in a technology
primarily developed (INRIA and ENSPC) and used by France. Python and all
its libraries and communities are so much more dynamic !
And also I've heard that Scilab was developed in Fortran in a way which
make it rigid and that the sources are poorly documented, not a good
sign for an open source software (and Scilab isn't 'Free' for the FSF).

Regards,


*********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********

On 8 Oct 2005 11:06:25 -0700, "Sébastien Boisgérault"
<Sebastien.Boisgerault at gmail.com> wrote :

> 
> Simulink is a framework widely used by the control engineers ...
> It is not *perfect* but the ODEs piece is probably the best
> part of the simulator. Why were you not convinced ?
> 
> You may also have a look at Scicos and Ptolemy II. These
> simulators are open-source ... but not based on Python.
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> SB
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Nicolas Pernetty a écrit :
> 
> > Hello Phil,
> >
> > Yes I have considered Octave. In fact I'm already using Matlab and
> > decided to 'reject' it for Python + Numeric/numarray + SciPy because
> > I think you could do more in Python and in more simple ways.
> >
> > Problem is that neither Octave, Matlab and Python offer today a
> > framework to build continuous system simulator (in fact Matlab with
> > Simulink and SimMechanics, do propose, but I was not convinced at
> > all).
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > *********** REPLY SEPARATOR  ***********
> >
> > On 7 Oct 2005 11:00:54 -0700, phil_nospam_schmidt at yahoo.com wrote :
> >
> > > Nicholas,
> > >
> > > Have you looked at Octave? It is not Python, but I believe it can
> > > talk to Python.
> > > Octave is comparable to Matlab for many things, including having
> > > ODE solvers. I have successfully used it to model and simulate
> > > simple systems. Complex system would be easy to model as well,
> > > provided that you model your dynamic elements with (systems of)
> > > differential equations.
> > >
> 



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