Subject: Re: Unfortunate newbie questions!

CPIM Ronin ronin_cpim at hotmail.com
Tue Sep 13 19:33:22 CEST 2005


Thanks Colin and Alessandro!

Alessandro, I've found most of your references and am going through them!

RC

>From: "Colin J. Williams" <cjw at sympatico.ca>
>To: python-list at python.org
>Subject: Re: Unfortunate newbie questions!
>Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2005 15:06:58 -0400
>CPIM Ronin wrote:
>>Hi Folks,
>>
>>I'm brand spanking new to Python, busy reading docs and going through two 
>>of the ubiquitous O'Reilly books--"Learning Python" by Lutz/Ascher and 
>>"Python Programming on Win32" by Hammond/Robinson.
>>
>>Still I have a just few newbie questions:
>>
>>    -    In the Windows Python version, how can it be configured
>>        to save all keyboard input for later review and revision?
>>        And how do I get to it?
>>
>Either PythonWin or the basic Python interactive shell can do most of the 
>work here.  Best to play with the various library functions.
>
>
>>    -   What book or doc would you recommend for a thorough
>>       thrashing of object oriented programming (from a Python
>>       perspective) for someone who is weak in OO? In other
>>       words, how can someone learn to think in an OO sense,
>>       rather than the old linear code sense? Hopefully, heavy
>>       on problems and solutions!
>No suggestion here.  I like Alex Martelli's Python in a Nutshell but it's 
>getting a bit long in the tooth now.
>
>Colin W.
>>
>>     -  In college, I came to admire the Schaum's Outline book
>>       approach--again heavy on problems and solutions! What's
>>       the closest Python equivalent?
>>
>>Thanks.
>>
>>RC

>From: Alessandro Bottoni <alessandro.bottoni at infinito.it>
>Reply-To: alessandro.bottoni at infinito.it
>To: python-list at python.org
>Subject: Re: Unfortunate newbie questions!
>Date: Mon, 12 Sep 2005 19:22:30 GMT
> >     -   What book or doc would you recommend for a thorough
> >        thrashing of object oriented programming (from a Python
> >        perspective) for someone who is weak in OO? In other
> >        words, how can someone learn to think in an OO sense,
> >        rather than the old linear code sense? Hopefully, heavy
> >        on problems and solutions!
>
>If OOP is the problem, you could try this:
>Object Oriented Analysys
>Peter Coad, Edward Yourdon
>Prentice Hall
>Old by quite informative
>
>As an alternative, have a look at the following ones.
>
>Thinking in Python:
>http://www.mindview.net/Books/TIPython
>
>Dive into Python:
>http://diveintopython.org/
>
>How to Think Like a Computer Scientist:
>http://www.ibiblio.org/obp/thinkCSpy/
>
> >      -  In college, I came to admire the Schaum's Outline book
> >        approach--again heavy on problems and solutions! What's
> >        the closest Python equivalent?
>
>Maybe this:
>
>Python Cookbook
>Alex Martelli, David Ascher
>O'Reilly
>
>HTH
>-----------------------------------
>Alessandro Bottoni
>

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