WTF? Printing unicode strings

Serge Orlov Serge.Orlov at gmail.com
Fri May 19 02:22:19 CEST 2006


Ron Garret wrote:
> In article <1147992722.970761.220840 at j73g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
>  "Serge Orlov" <Serge.Orlov at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Ron Garret wrote:
> > > In article <mailman.5906.1147989402.27775.python-list at python.org>,
> > >  Robert Kern <robert.kern at gmail.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > > Ron Garret wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > I forgot to mention:
> > > > >
> > > > >>>>sys.getdefaultencoding()
> > > > >
> > > > > 'utf-8'
> > > >
> > > > A) You shouldn't be able to do that.
> > >
> > > What can I say?  I can.
> > >
> > > > B) Don't do that.
> > >
> > > OK.  What should I do instead?
> >
> > Exact answer depends on what OS and terminal you are using and what
> > your program is supposed to do, are you going to distribute the program
> > or it's just for internal use.
>
> I'm using an OS X terminal to ssh to a Linux machine.

In theory it should work out of the box. OS X terminal should set
enviromental variable LANG=en_US.utf-8, then ssh should transfer this
variable to Linux and python will know that your terminal is utf-8.
Unfortunately AFAIK OS X terminal doesn't set that variable and most
(all?) ssh clients don't transfer it between machines. As a workaround
you can set that variable on linux yourself . This should work in the
command line right away:

LANG=en_US.utf-8 python -c "print unichr(0xbd)"

Or put the following line in ~/.bashrc and logout/login

export LANG=en_US.utf-8




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