Python 2.5 ; Effbot console ; thank ; pb release.

Paul Boddie paul at boddie.org.uk
Mon Oct 23 20:42:09 CEST 2006


Steve Holden wrote:
> Fredrik Lundh wrote:
> > Méta-MCI wrote:
> >
> >>For the professional developments, it is a major risk.

I'll cut in here and mention that it's a risk that can be managed
through various well understood methods of deployment. For me, Python
2.4 is going to be good enough until (and even beyond) the time I can
be bothered to either upgrade my distribution's packages or to upgrade
my distribution and get the packages for Python 2.5. At which point,
I'll just need to select the pinnacles of my package tower; then I can
hopefully just press the button and have everything working on Python
2.5.

Generally, package developers shouldn't be "aggressively" using the
absolute latest and greatest version's features, and if you're pursuing
"professional developments" you might want to keep using the mature
releases of Python whilst letting other developers know that adoption
of their stuff will be limited if they make it part of a rapidly moving
target. Sure, I can imagine that people are desperate to use the "with"
statement all over the place, but maintainers of widely used (or
"professional") stuff have to exercise some conservatism - otherwise
someone has to start forking and backporting their changes.

> > some days, I ask myself why I shouldn't just use GPL for everything I
> > do, and ship it as source code only.
> >
> To which I presume the answer is that you are considerate of Windows
> users who'd rather not compile their own Windows applications due to the
> cost of using the commercial compilers and the complexity of using the
> open source ones.

Well, there's a commercial service you could offer, Steve. ;-)

> Whatever the reasons, a vote of thanks to all extension authors who *do*
> bother to compile for Windows (despite complaints from others who don't
> feel this happens quickly enough).

This happens every time a new release of Python comes out: people want
to play with the new features, but they experience a period of
frustration because their favourite packages aren't available. I'd
advise people to download the installer, get their fill of the new
features for a few minutes, then schedule another look in a few weeks.
Or they can start paying people to make it all happen "yesterday", of
course.

Paul




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