Why do this?

Hari Sekhon hpsekhon at googlemail.com
Thu Oct 5 12:39:25 CEST 2006


Do whichever makes you happy I'd say

The only real difference is coding style and the formatting options of 
the %s way that I can see.

%s is negligibly slower in my tests, but we're talking the tiniest 
fraction of a second over thousands of iterations, not worth considering...

-h

Hari Sekhon



Matthew Warren wrote:
> Ok, not really python focused, but it feels like the people here could
> explain it for me :)
>
> Now, I started programming when I was 8 with BBC Basic.
>
> I never took any formal classes however, and I have never become an
> expert programmer. I'm an average/hobbyist programmer with quite a few
> languages under my belt but I cant do any really fancy tricks with any
> of them. (although Python might be nudging me into more advanced things,
> now I'm starting to get what all the __method__ thingies and operators
> are all about)
>
> I learned over the years to do things like the following, and I like
> doing it like this because of readability, something Python seems to
> focus on :-
>
> Print "There are "+number+" ways to skin a "+furryanimal
>
> But nowadays, I see things like this all over the place;
>
> print("There are %s ways to skin a %s" % (number, furryanimal))
>
> Now I understand there can be additional formatting benefits when
> dealing with numbers, decimal places etc.. But to me, for strings, the
> second case is much harder to read than the first.
>
> I hope I'm not being dense.
>
> The result is that I have pathalogically avoided print "%s" % (thing)
> because it seems to just over complicate things.
>
>
> Ta, :)
>
> Matt.
>
>
>
>
>
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