Pickled objects over the network

Walker Lindley brotherjenos at gmail.com
Fri Jul 20 07:29:37 CEST 2007


Right, I could use Pyro, but I don't need RPC, I just wanted an easy way to
send objects across the network. I'm sure both Pyro and Yami can do that and
I may end up using one of them. For the initial version pickle will work
because we have the networking issues figured out with it, just not the
security problem. So we may end up just sending strings back and forth that
will let us fill out an object's member variables on the other end. It's
much less cool, but it seems like it'd be more secure.


-Walker

On 7/19/07, Rustom Mody <rustompmody at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Irmen de Jong wrote
> > In what way would Pyro be overkill where Yaml (also a module that you
> need
> > to install separately) wouldn't be?
>
> Sure they are the same to install and sure pyro can do the job (pyro
> is a nice package).
>
> But I got the impression that the questioner wanted to do the
> networking stuff himself at a low level (using sockets) and the data
> management using some available library -- pickle.
>
> Since pickle has problems
> -- does not interface well with networking
> -- security issues
> -- has an xml option that according to the docs is an order of magnitude
> slower
>
> I thought I would point out yaml (with safe-load) which sits somewhere
> inbetween the xml-pickle and the default pickle.
>
> I should also mention here that I find yaml is much more known and
> used in the ruby and perl world than in the python world.  This is
> unfortunate considering that both ruby and perl have a traditional
> syntax (begin end, { } etc ).  On the other hand, python and yaml have
> similar modern syntactic structures -- structure follows indentation
> -- and are therefore well matched to each other.
>
> So in summary the 'competition' is not between yaml and pyro -- pyro
> could easily have a pickle-using-yaml option -- but between yaml and
> xml.
> --
> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
>



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