Can a low-level programmer learn OOP?

Wayne Brehaut wbrehaut at mcsnet.ca
Mon Jul 16 19:36:43 CEST 2007


On Mon, 16 Jul 2007 09:55:35 +0200, Bruno Desthuilliers
<bruno.42.desthuilliers at wtf.websiteburo.oops.com> wrote:

>Wayne Brehaut a écrit :
>> On Sat, 14 Jul 2007 06:01:56 +0200, Bruno Desthuilliers
>> <bdesth.quelquechose at free.quelquepart.fr> wrote:
>> 
>>> Chris Carlen a écrit :
>>>> Hi:
>>>>
>>>>  From what I've read of OOP, I don't get it.  I have also found some 
>>>> articles profoundly critical of OOP.  I tend to relate to these articles.
>>>>
>> 
>> === 8< ===
>> 
>>>> Hence, being a hardware designer rather than a computer scientist, I am 
>>>> conditioned to think like a machine.  I think this is the main reason 
>>>> why OOP has always repelled me.
>>> OTOH, OO is about machines - at least as conceveid by Alan Key, who 
>>> invented the term and most of the concept. According to him, each object 
>>> is a (simulation of) a small machine.
>> 
>> Oh you young'uns, not versed in The Ancient Lore, but filled with
>> self-serving propaganda from Xerox PARC, Alan Kay, and Smalltalk
>> adherents everywhere!
>
>Not feeling concerned.
>
>(snip pro-simula/anti-Xerox propaganda).

Or, more accurately, pro:

1. Nygaard & Dahl as the inventors of most of the concept of OOP
2. Simula as the first OOP
3. Kay as the originator of the term OOP
4. Kay, Xerox PARC, and Smalltalk as making significant useful
advances in implementation of OOP and "popularizing" it 

and anti:

1. attributing credit for any accomplishment to someone who doesn't
himself claim it and even denies it

wwwayne o/o



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