How to determine which method was used in an inheritance heirarchy?

Erik Jones erik at myemma.com
Mon Jul 16 16:50:32 CEST 2007


On Jul 16, 2007, at 3:37 AM, Gabriel Genellina wrote:

> En Mon, 16 Jul 2007 03:56:18 -0300, Erik Jones <erik at myemma.com>  
> escribió:
>
>> Perhaps an even better example of what I'm trying to do would be in
>> order (this is minus any exception handling):
>>
>> import sys
>>
>> def mytrace(frame, event, arg):
>>      if event == 'call':
>>          func_name = frame.f_code.co_name
>>
>>          if func_name in frame.f_locals['self'].__class__.__dict__:
>>              print frame.f_locals['self'].__class__.__name__
>>          else:
>>              for base in frame.f_locals['self'].__class__.__bases__:
>>                  if func_name in base.__dict__:
>>                      print base.__name__
>>                      break
>>
>>
>> class A(object):
>>      def __init__(self):
>>          pass
>>
>> class B(A):
>>      def __init__(self):
>>          A.__init__(self)
>>
>> sys.settrace(mytrace)
>> B()
>>
>> This will output:
>>
>> B
>> B
>
> If you don't mind post-processing the results, you can log the  
> function
> name and source module (from frame.f_code.co_name and co_filename) and
> current line number (frame.f_lineno). Later, obtaining the class  
> name from
> those is a bit tricky (and not even the inspect module does it  
> right), but
> perhaps using the tokenizer module, watching for lines that contain
> "class" <name> is enough.


I was afraid of that.  I used pretty much that tokenizer trick for a  
unit test generator I wrote in php a while back and felt like that  
was pretty clunky then.

Erik Jones

Software Developer | Emma®
erik at myemma.com
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615.292.0777 (fax)

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