Arrays

cokofreedom at gmail.com cokofreedom at gmail.com
Wed Nov 14 10:56:17 CET 2007


On Nov 14, 3:51 am, "davisn90... at gmail.com" <davisn90... at gmail.com>
wrote:
> Modules contain objects.  When you want to import a specific set of
> objects contained in a module into the local namespace, you use:
>   from <module> import <names to import>
> For example:
>   from math import sqrt
>   from math import sin, cos
>
> If you want to import everything from a module, use:
>   from <module> import *
> For example:
>   from math import *
>
> If you want to import a module as an entity itself, use:
>   import <module>
> For example:
>   import math #Use, for example, math.sqrt to call the sqrt function
>
> You can also use import ... as ... to "rename" an imported object:
>   import math as m #Now use m.sqrt instead of math.sqrt
>   from math import sqrt as square_root #sqrt is now bound to
> square_root in the local module
>
> In the array module, there is an object named array.  You could access
> using:
>   import array
>   array.array
> or
>   from array import array
>   array
> or
>   from array import array as foobar
>   foobar
> or ...
> The way you choose to actually do this is up to you.  Most people just
> decide what they like/makes the most sense.
>
> In the math module, there is no object called math.  That is why we do
> not use
>   >>> from math import math
>   Traceback (most recent call last):
>     File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
>   ImportError: cannot import name math
>
> --Nathan Davis
>
> On Nov 13, 7:25 pm, "Gordon C" <gc... at vif.com> wrote:
>
> > OK Steve, But why do we say "from array import array" and NOT  "from math
> > import math"? Why the difference in syntax?
> > Gord
>
> > "Steven D'Aprano" <st... at REMOVE-THIS-cybersource.com.au> wrote in message
>
> >news:13jk6af1vs5g89 at corp.supernews.com...
>
> > > On Tue, 13 Nov 2007 11:26:28 -0500, Gordon C wrote:
>
> > >> OK, thanks to all. The key statement is "from array import array" which
> > >> is not exactly intuitive!
>
> > > "The only intuitive interface is the nipple. After that, it's all
> > > learned."  --  Bruce Ediger on user interfaces.
>
> > > Once you've been using Python for a while, using import becomes as
> > > intuitive as a spoon. The only tricky part is knowing *which* module to
> > > import. But, honestly, are you surprised to learn that the array type is
> > > held in in the array module?
>
> > > --
> > > Steven.

Let me just say, that is a perfect reply!




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