why should I learn python

7stud bbxx789_05ss at yahoo.com
Sat Sep 8 01:13:35 CEST 2007


On Sep 6, 10:51 pm, James Stroud <jstr... at mbi.ucla.edu> wrote:
> BartlebyScrivener wrote:
> > On Sep 6, 5:36 pm, André <andre.robe... at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >> Easy to read, easy to write, good libraries and, I have found, an
> >> extremely helpful community.
>
> >> Hobbyists (like me) can work on projects written in Python on and off
> >> (sometimes for weeks if not months without programming) and be able to
> >> resume the work very quickly (because it's so easy to read and
> >> understand the code).
>
> > I second these.  I am not a programmer. You can get busy with other
> > projects for weeks and come back to Python code and pick up where you
> > left off, because it uses WORDS.  Try remembering what (<>) or <*>
> > means after being away from Perl for a month.
>
> > rd
>
> Better is to try to remember the differences between and uses of:
>
>    $stupidPerl[4]
>    ${stupidPerl}[4]
>    $stupidPerl->[4]
>    ${stupidPerl}->[4]
>    $#stupidPerl[4]
>    $#{stupidPerl}[4]
>    $#{stupidPerl}->[4]
>    $#{$stupidPerl}->[4]->[4]
>
> And so on.
>
> Quiz: which are valid? (Careful now.)
>
> The friggin' language is useless (except for the fact that, like
> window$, a lot of people insist on using it over superior alternatives
> and so you find yourself confronting it from time to time). In fact, it
> was the need to use nested data structures that made me move to python
> when I realized all of the above would be a thing of the past (also made
> useless my perl "cheat sheet" that sits in my big-fat-useless-camel-book).
>
> $Perl->[Useless]
>
> --
> James Stroud
> UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics
> Box 951570
> Los Angeles, CA 90095
>
> http://www.jamesstroud.com/

rofl.




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