[1,2,3] exactly same as [1,2,3,] ?

James Mills prologic at shortcircuit.net.au
Fri Aug 29 01:35:10 CEST 2008


On Fri, Aug 29, 2008 at 9:28 AM, Paul McNett <p at ulmcnett.com> wrote:
> When confronted with this type of question, I ask the interpreter:
>
> {{{
> mac:~ pmcnett$ python
> Python 2.5.2 (r252:60911, Feb 22 2008, 07:57:53)
> [GCC 4.0.1 (Apple Computer, Inc. build 5363)] on darwin
> Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>>> [1,2,3] == [1,2,3,]
> True
> }}}

I must point out though that although they contain
the same elements/data, they are not the same
object/instance.

{{{
#!python
>>> x = [1, 2, 3]
>>> y = [1, 2, 3]
>>> id(x)
3083095148L
>>> id(y)
3082953324L
>>> x == y
True
}}}

If you view the documentation for a list:
{{{
#!sh
$ pydoc list
}}}

list's have an __eq__ that is used to compare the
equality of 2 lists.

cheers
James


-- 
--
-- "Problems are solved by method"



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