Python Standardization: Wikipedia entry

Terry Reedy tjreedy at udel.edu
Fri Feb 1 01:18:57 CET 2008


"John Nagle" <nagle at animats.com> wrote in message 
news:47a251e7$0$36328$742ec2ed at news.sonic.net..


>   Submitting Python 2.5 to ISO/ANSI might be a good idea.

ANSI does not actually make standards.  It make metastandards about how to 
make standards (both style and process) and accredites US standard-making 
bodies that will follow those metastandards.  The processes require 
committee meetings and public comment periods -- a few years and some $$$. 
There in no guarantee that what would come out of such a process would be 
what went in, so 'Standard Python' might easily be a language with no 
implementations.

ANSI standards are owned by ANSI or perhaps the accrediting body.  In any 
case, electronic copies sell for $30.  They cannot legally be accessed free 
as for the docs at python.org. 






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