Python 2.5: wrong number of arguments given in TypeError for function argument aggregation (dictionary input vs the norm)

James Mills prologic at shortcircuit.net.au
Fri Oct 31 00:33:36 CET 2008


On Fri, Oct 31, 2008 at 9:18 AM, John Krukoff <jkrukoff at ltgc.com> wrote:
> Are you sure? It looks like his complaint isn't that it doesn't work,
> but that the error message is misleading.
>
> With the setup:
>
> Python 2.5.2 (r252:60911, Sep 22 2008, 12:08:38)
> [GCC 4.1.2 (Gentoo 4.1.2 p1.1)] on linux2
> Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>>> def foo( a, b, c ):
> ...  pass
> ...
>
> Compare the error messages from:
>
>>>> foo( **{ 'a' : 1, 'c' : 3 } )
> Traceback (most recent call last):
>  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
> TypeError: foo() takes exactly 3 non-keyword arguments (1 given)
>
> to the error message here:
>
>>>> foo( **{ 'a' : 1, 'b' : 3 } )
> Traceback (most recent call last):
>  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
> TypeError: foo() takes exactly 3 non-keyword arguments (2 given)

Ahh I see what you mean. Yes ok that is confusing
and probably a bug :) I missed that. The OPs
subject was a bit misleading :)

Python probably indeed is bailing out too early
in this case.

--JamesMills

-- 
--
-- "Problems are solved by method"



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