Not fully OO ?

Aaron "Castironpi" Brady castironpi at gmail.com
Sat Sep 27 03:58:30 CEST 2008


On Sep 26, 8:10 pm, "Tim Rowe" <digi... at gmail.com> wrote:
> 2008/9/27 Aaron Castironpi Brady <castiro... at gmail.com>:
>
> > But I, and I imagine I'm not the only one, would love to know the
> > example that C# developed faster than Python.  I suppose the fact that
> > the line of wx specification that has two identifiers where C# has one
> > is more of a drain on programmer resources than may commonly be
> > recognized--- not the same as the cost of one extra word in a paper or
> > in an editorial.  Similarly, maybe the program that has one extra
> > identifier in a line takes a lot more time to develop.
>
> But I didn't use wx -- that's rather the point.  Long before the days
> of Python, I kept wanting to use Modula2 but kept getting driven back
> to C because in Modula2 I kept having to write stuff that was already
> in C libraries. Modula2 was a far better language, but C usually was
> far more productive because of what went around it.  C#'s tight
> integration with .net and VS mean that it's not a question of one
> identifier instead of two, it's *zero* identifiers instead of two
> because the tool does it all for me.  Does that mean that C# is a
> better language than Python? No, of course not. Does it mean that what
> I was doing was not possible in Python? No, of course not. Does it
> mean that C# was more productive than Python for me doing that
> particular job? Yes it does. (FWIW, I also found the .net XML handling
> easier to cope with on that same job).
>
> One day Iron Python plus the VS integration might wean me off C# but
> last time I looked it wasn't close. Maybe I should take another look
> and see how it's coming on.
>
> --
> Tim Rowe

No way.  It's *zero* instead of one, if so, because the only thing C#
has is a bunch of handcuffs and implicit 'self'.  You have a line
like:

n= aTree.ExpandedCount

What in 'wx', which I -am- using, <avoids insubordinate tone>, takes
more identifiers:

n= self.aTree.ExpandedCount

or if you're 'inlining', for lack of better words, everything, outside
a class,

n= aForm.aTree.ExpandedCount.

For a grand total of 1 'aForm' identifier that C# infers implicitly.



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