debugging in IPython

Nick Matzke matzke at berkeley.edu
Fri Apr 24 23:45:56 CEST 2009


This is a general question, but maybe there is some obvious solution 
I've missed.

When I am writing code, I have a main script that calls functions in 
another .py file.  When there is a bug or crash in the main script, in 
IPython I can just start typing the names of variables etc. to see what 
they contained at the point where the script crashed.

However, if the bug is in a function I've called from the main script, 
the crash dialog will indicate the function, line of code, etc. where 
the crash occurred.  However, the only variables I can access at the 
IPython prompt are those used in the main script.

Is there any way to access the variables in those sub-functions after a 
crash, in IPython or something similar?  The only other option is 
pasting all the code from each function into the IPython manually, or 
adding print lines throughout the relevant sub-functions.  This is 
doable but extremely tedious when the crash occurred 5 functions deep, 
or at some unknown point within a for loop.

Any help much appreciated!

Cheers!
Nick


-- 
====================================================
Nicholas J. Matzke
Ph.D. student, Graduate Student Researcher
Huelsenbeck Lab
Center for Theoretical Evolutionary Genomics
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Department of Integrative Biology
University of California, Berkeley

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