Need cleanup advice for multiline string

Mensanator mensanator at aol.com
Wed Aug 19 06:52:43 CEST 2009


On Aug 17, 11:35�pm, Carl Banks <pavlovevide... at gmail.com> wrote:
> On Aug 17, 8:49�pm, Mensanator <mensana... at aol.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Aug 17, 8:04 pm, Carl Banks <pavlovevide... at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > On Aug 17, 5:40 pm, Mensanator <mensana... at aol.com> wrote:
>
> > > > On Aug 17, 4:06 pm, Carl Banks <pavlovevide... at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > > > On Aug 17, 10:03 am, Jean-Michel Pichavant <jeanmic... at sequans.com>
> > > > > wrote:
>
> > > > > > I'm no English native, but I already heard women/men referring to a
> > > > > > group as "guys", no matter that group gender configuration. It's even
> > > > > > used for group composed exclusively of women. Moreover it looks like a
> > > > > > *very* friendly form, so there is really nothing to worry about it.
>
> > > > > I like how being very friendly means calling people after a guy who
> > > > > tried to blow up the English Parliament.
>
> > > > So?
>
> > > I also like how making an amusing pointless observation
>
> > Pointless, yes, but what was amusing abot the observation?
>
> The irony that in being friendly that you're calling someone a
> terrorist. �

People of Irish Catholic heritage find that extremely offensive,
like asking how many Jews you can fit into a Volswagen.

> I guess I shouldn't have expected you to get it.

Oh, I got it alright, moreso than you could possibly
imagine.

>
> > > gets people all huffy.
>
> > That wasn't huffy. You want to see huffy, make a wisecrack
> > comparing mothballs to Zyklon B, you'll REALLY get a load
> > of huffy replies.
>
> > > (BTW, lest anyone is not aware, that is the origin of the word "guy",
>
> > It most certainly is not.
>
> My dictionary disagrees with you.

hen yor dictionary is wrong. Or, more likely, you have
comprehension problems. People have been named "Guy"
for centuries prior to Mr. Fawkes.

Try reading my whole post before shouting your mouth off.

>
> > Maybe the origin of that
> > word's useage as a genric reference to a male, but
> > you didn't say that.
>
> > > this was not some random association.)
>
> > Penny for the guy?
>
> Probably that phrase was part of the word's gradual common adoption.

Kinda why I mentioned it. Duh.

>
> Carl Banks




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