Explanation for trailing comma in example from Learning Python?

Chris Rebert clp2 at rebertia.com
Thu Feb 19 22:04:34 CET 2009


> On Thu, Feb 19, 2009 at 2:54 PM, Christian Heimes <lists at cheimes.de> wrote:
>>
>> Carl Schumann wrote:
>> > I could see the logic in always or never having a trailing comma.   What
>> > I don't understand here is why only the single element case has a
>> > trailing comma.   Any explanations please?
>>
>> Does this code shad some light on the trailing comma? :)
>>
>> >>> (1) == 1
>> True
>> >>> (1,) == 1
>> False
>> >>> type((1))
>> <type 'int'>
>> >>> type((1,))
>> <type 'tuple'>
>>
>> >>> a = 1
>> >>> a
>> 1
>> >>> a = (1)
>> >>> a
>> 1
>> >>> a = (1,)
>> >>> a
>> (1,)
>> >>> a = 1,
>> >>> a
>> (1,)
>>
On Thu, Feb 19, 2009 at 12:57 PM, alex goretoy
<aleksandr.goretoy at gmail.com> wrote:
> Thank you for clerification Christian,
> when using trailing comma with print statement/function, does it not mean to
> output newline after printed data?
>
> -Alex Goretoy
> http://www.goretoy.com

Yes it does (it outputs a space instead of a newline), but only with
the print-statement, not the print() function.

Cheers,
Chris
-- 
Follow the path of the Iguana...
http://rebertia.com



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