tough-to-explain Python

Bret Fledderjohn freelancer317 at gmail.com
Wed Jul 8 01:49:54 CEST 2009


I really enjoyed your boxes analogy, from a guy with a trucking background,
it makes a lot of sense!
-Bret


> ... The more I delve into OOP the more I liken an 'object' to a box. A box
> with a shipping manifest.
>
> There are big boxes,
> little boxes,
> squat boxes and so on.
>
> A box can contain corn flakes,
> bullets, raisins, rice, burlap, silk, motorcycle(s), soap and more.
>
> The manifest describes contents.
> The manifest is there but the description(s) change with content (type).
> The descriptions always use one or more of the basics like: color, count,
> dimension and so forth.
>
> Just like an OOP object.
>
> A box can contain things of all sorts, including references to the contents
> of other box(es). A box can even be a virtual of another (the global
> concept).  The return statement, in this context, means hauling the contents
> of the box (and/or its manifest) back to (wherever) and disposing of the
> current box (a local).
>
> Just like an OOP object.
>
>
> It is easier to visualize a box and it's use than a non described blob.
> Abstracts are never precise -  hence the evolution of the word.
>
>
> The one thing a teacher will always fail is the same as anyone else who
> tries to adequately describe a pretty sunset to a person born totally blind.
> No point(s) of reference.
>
>
>
> Time for me to sign off.  To all those that helped me when I needed it -
>
> I thank you very much.
>
> Food for thought: your watch (clock) does not tell time.
> The watch (clock) only mimics one movement of the earth.
> ie... 3 dimensions are still static, the 4th is movement.
>
>
> Steve


-- 
- Bret
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