New to python, can i ask for a little help?

Chris Rebert clp2 at rebertia.com
Wed May 13 22:58:36 CEST 2009


On Wed, May 13, 2009 at 12:22 PM, warhammer1805 at gmail.com
<warhammer1805 at gmail.com> wrote:
> On May 12, 9:27 pm, Chris Rebert <c... at rebertia.com> wrote:
>> On Tue, May 12, 2009 at 9:18 PM, warhammer1... at gmail.com
>>
>>
>>
>> <warhammer1... at gmail.com> wrote:
>> > I loaded python 3.1
>> > I can use the gui and i see the following:
>>
>> > Python 3.0.1 (r301:69561, Feb 13 2009, 20:04:18) [MSC v.1500 32 bit
>> > (Intel)] on win32
>> > Type "copyright", "credits" or "license()" for more information.
>>
>> > It would seem that this is working correctly and there is no path
>> > problem.
>> > I am running windows vista.
>>
>> > When i put in a test string i see this:
>>
>> > Python 3.0.1 (r301:69561, Feb 13 2009, 20:04:18) [MSC v.1500 32 bit
>> > (Intel)] on win32
>> > Type "copyright", "credits" or "license()" for more information.
>> >>>> print "hello world!"
>> > SyntaxError: invalid syntax (<pyshell#0>, line 1)
>>
>> > Can anyone tell me what is wrong? I didnt expect that error....
>>
>> The print-statement was removed in Python 3.0. Now it's just a
>> function. You'll have to use:
>>
>> print("hello world!")
>>
>> instead.
>>
>> Please also read the 3.0 transition docs:http://docs.python.org/3.0/whatsnew/3.0.html
>> Note that Python 3.0 differs significantly from Python 2.x
>>
>> Cheers,
>> Chris
>> --http://blog.rebertia.com
>
> Hi Chris,
> Thank you for the pointer! that sure helped alot.
> Do you think i should be using a different version of python? I dont
> normally do much programming. I used to do some C along time ago. I
> want to get into something again and python seems to be popular.

You should probably use Python v2.6 instead for the time being; most
libraries have yet to be ported to Python 3.0, so 2.6 has many more
libraries available for it currently. Python 3.0 is also mostly the
same as 2.6, so learning 2.6 won't be a waste of time and will help
you when the full transition to 3.0 is eventually made.

> Could you also tell me who uses python in IT areas? I see alot of
> python and Mysql. And i see python developer jobs as standalone too.

See http://www.python.org/about/apps/ and http://www.python.org/about/success/

Cheers,
Chris
-- 
http://blog.rebertia.com



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